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I don't believe in any deities because...

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#1
Ungodly

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I don't believe in any deities because I've never seen any evidence that one exists.

In much the same way, I do not believe that there is an invisible pink elephant standing under the olive tree in my front yard. I've never seen any evidence of this invisible elephant, so why would I believe that it was there?

#2
Dax

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I don't believe because beliefs are just plain stupid.

[quote name='"Bertrand Rusell"]If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit' date=' nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.[/quote']

#3
Sandy

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I tend to feel manipulated by believers. There exudes from them a certain arrogance that offends me. They have developed a faith in the unseen and unproven and I feel uncomfortable around them. I have not developed a faith in anything except from my own kids and dogs. Never trust a cat!

#4
Ungodly

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I tend to feel manipulated by believers. There exudes from them a certain arrogance that offends me. They have developed a faith in the unseen and unproven and I feel uncomfortable around them. I have not developed a faith in anything except from my own kids and dogs. Never trust a cat!


Yes, I sense this arrogance too, it's like a contempt they seem to feel for people who are not members of the club.

And I agree about cats, I think they are natural-born Republicans, after all, they're predators.

#5
Jinny the Squinny

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Arrogance is not a property associated with believing in actual God, as opposed to the cliched beardy sky tyrant. The arrogance and hypocrisy of any kind of religious type is in direct contradiction of the theistic paradigm.

I was pondering on the bus today, I am an atheist... well, to be precise, I'm an atheist when it comes to most of the "Gods" people have tried to sell me.

It's unfair to say beliefs about God in general are stupid... a telelogical philosophy of science is as valid as an atheist one, since theism, deism and atheism alike are philosophical/metaphysical and not truly "scientific" in nature. What is stupid is to have a self-contradictory belief system, and to maintain such beliefs when there is no good reason to do so.

I reject christianity as a religion because it is inconsistent with the a priori truths of a theistic paradigm, as well as being inconsistent with the teachings of its alleged founder. The teachings of Christ, on the other hand, are perfectly consistent with theism, once freed from the shackles of "christianity". I'm always amazed by how difficult people find it to actually read the Gospels without prejudice, believer and non-believer alike.

#6
Dax

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Jinny, I give you another few years before you'll turn to the dark side like all of us :evil:

#7
Sandy

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If she's bright, she will indeed.

#8
Jinny the Squinny

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Nah, I'm a die hard theist.... I used to not be one. :-)

#9
Val

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When a religious nut asks me: because there is no such thing as "god," so why would I believe in one? I prefer to give them simple answers since that's all they deserve. I'm sick of being told to read the Bible, because that will somehow make me a believer...or that following God is the only way. Blah blah blah blah.

The honest reason why I don't believe.....seeing something like the Grand Canyon can be a very powerful experience. It feels like you are in the middle of a painting, and it can create a spiritual experience. To be a part of something so awesome that nature created...it is a cool feeling. However, there are still reasons that the wonders of nature occur. Knowing the scientific reason for thunderstorms or mountains doesn't make them any less spectacular, though. Science doesn't take away from the beauty. For me, it adds to it.

#10
Jinny the Squinny

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Science doesn't take anything away from God, either. It's ignorance and superstition to belive in a "God of the gaps" and indeed falls into the mistake that atheist philosophers make-- it assumes that if something can be explained in physical terms then that completely removes the need for a metaphysics or philosophy of science.

"Miracle" is a funny word, personally I think miracles are usually perfectly natural phenomena, as are disasters, it's just the timing that makes it a miracle. I happily bet than when the Children of Israel crossed the Sea of Reeds they would have been saying something like "Aint it a miracle the water is so low this time of year?" rather than "look! Moses just did a pukka trick!"

It's the same with creation. The more scientists tell me it's all just an accident of timing, random events, etc, the more it sounds like a "miracle" to me.

Incidentally... I don't know why we've evolved a sense of the numinous and a sense of aesthetics... unless I start thinking in teleological terms. How do atheists explain these phenomena?

#11
Sandy

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I see a belief in God simply a control tool designed by some human who wants to be the tribal leader. In many of the books I have read on early man, the first Gods were women. They made the social rules and they were obeyed. One writer speculated that when men discovered they planted the seeds to make the babies, they took over the tribes and put women in a minor social position.

Women used sex to control their tribes and the men used the terror of the unknown to keep everyone in line. When you think about it, little has changed.

The Christian belief was found in the mind of one man. If there was a Jesus, I feel certain he wanted people to love one another and all this Christian crap was added by Paul. He was a madman who destroyed much of what Jesus preached. The men loved Paul because he had no respect for women or homosexuals.

Christianity has evolved into despicable men like Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell and thousands of others who believe they have been touched by a holy spirit. This movement has tried to destroy any effort to bring out critical thinking on any subject. They have been effective as we can see the millions of people who adore men like George Bush and his hateful religious right. Organize religion has changed the development of our children

#12
The White Coyote

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Val, It was at the side of the canyon that I lost the God of christianity and found the God of nature. She is beautiful. :D

PS. Belle likes her too! :lol:

#13
Jinny the Squinny

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[quote]He was a madman who destroyed much of what Jesus preached. The men loved Paul because he had no respect for women or homosexuals. [/quote]

Paul has a very, very bad reputation, but really, for his day, he was surprisingly "liberated".

Here's a good trivia question: What is the oldest known written reference to women being inherently equal to men?

Yep, it's in the epistles of Paul.

[quote]Christianity has evolved into despicable men like Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell and thousands of others who believe they have been touched by a holy spirit.[/quote]

Surely it has devolved? :-)

[quote]Organize religion has changed the development of our children

#14
Ripley

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I tend to feel manipulated by believers. There exudes from them a certain arrogance that offends me. They have developed a faith in the unseen and unproven and I feel uncomfortable around them. I have not developed a faith in anything except from my own kids and dogs. Never trust a cat!


I can't say it better myself, except that you are so wrong about cats....they ROCK !! I love my dog more than almost everything else, but my cats entertain the hell out of me.

#15
Unbeliever

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A guy I know wants to debate Pascal's Wager with me, but I hesitate to get into it with him because I've had similar debates with him in the past, and he doesn't debate very well. He can't seem to understand the simplest rules of good debating, such as the use of hypothetical examples, like if I say "If A believes X on faith, and B believes not-X on faith, how do we tell which is correct, if either?", he'll say something like, "Well, there's your problem right there! There's no such thing as "A" or "B", and and there's no such thing as "X" and "not-X", so you're not even talking about reality!"

SHEESH!

And he thinks he's extremely intelligent! :roll:

But usually, if someone asks me if I believe in God, I just ask them which one, and ask them to define it, which they can never do, they just say things like "Well, the God of the Bible!"

#16
Dax

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Pascal's Wager... the most flawed modern piece of philosophy. I'd even prefer Hegel above Pascal!

Anyway, I believe in God too. I'm a naturalistic pantheist by word: I believe we can substitute the words Universe, life, love, laws of physics, etc, with God because that's where I think the word God originated: a word to capture the entire universe and all the mechanisms by which everything works by saying 'God'... unfortunately, people gave God a personality and turned a word in a deity or supernatural force. But actually, what I just described is not pantheism, but pure atheism. God is everything, but in the end God is just a word to capture everything.


P.S. I'm the first to make a multipaged topic! Do I now get free membership? :D

#17
Ungodly

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P.S. I'm the first to make a multipaged topic! Do I now get free membership? :D

Definitely, you get the free Platinum Level membership at a great discount!

Anyway, I believe in God too. I'm a naturalistic pantheist by word:

OK, that seems to me to be a fairly benign belief, especially since you don't propose to blow people up to get them to agree with you.

#18
Val

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Val, It was at the side of the canyon that I lost the God of christianity and found the God of nature. She is beautiful. :D

PS. Belle likes her too! :lol:


:D It was at the canyon that I really started appreciating how cool the earth can be. I'm one of those geeks that goes on tours, and I just couldn't grasp everything they told me about the Grand Canyon....it's just so cool!

I wanna go back!

#19
Val

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Incidentally... I don't know why we've evolved a sense of the numinous and a sense of aesthetics... unless I start thinking in teleological terms. How do atheists explain these phenomena?


#1 The biggest mistake is to try to disprove atheism by saying that we can't prove everything. For me, that's the whole point of atheism....admitting we don't know everything. That's my absolute favorite part.

#2 Evolutionary biology is in it's wee stages. Why do we have a sense of aesthetics? Possibly to find places that are safer. We tend to not find big crowds beautiful, and big crowds are where you are going to find diseases and whatnot. If our brains are not attracted to large crowds, we will try to avoid them, and hence we stay safer.

#20
Dax

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Anyway, I believe in God too. I'm a naturalistic pantheist by word:

OK, that seems to me to be a fairly benign belief, especially since you don't propose to blow people up to get them to agree with you.


Well, by word only... still atheist here. As I explained: I think people initially used the word God to describe the entire Universe, nothing to with a deity whatsoever. You just as well might call it Universe or Bwagachoochoo (whatever that is, just made it up).


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