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Single-payer healthcare in individual states

- - - - - healthcare single-payer universal healthcare new jersey california new york

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#1
Frozenwolf150

Frozenwolf150

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Earlier today I attended a rally for Medicare for All on the steps of the county courthouse.

 

In the face of Trumpcare, which would cause an additional 23 million to lose their coverage so that the top 2% can get over $275 billion in tax cuts, several states are now trying to implement single-payer on the local level.  (Vermont had already tried in 2011 but canceled 3 years later.)  Last month, it passed in the New York state assembly, and just last week it passed the state senate in California.  In New Jersey, state assemblyman and candidate for governor John Wisniewski introduced single-payer legislation recently.

 

This means there's a chance it could happen in my lifetime, hopefully before my life is cut short by ongoing medical problems.

 

The rally today was held by the local chapter of Our Revolution.  Among the other groups participating was the People's Organization for Progress, which is focused on civil rights.  The three governor candidates, the only three who support single-payer in NJ, were speakers at the rally: Wisniewski (D), Zinna (D), and Kaper-Dale (G).  Several of the speakers were part of the experts panel, and included the doctors listed on the events page above.  They talked about how universal healthcare would benefit both providers and patients.

 

Part of the rally included a petition signing, targeting the two Democratic senators, and the members of congress who have not yet sponsored HR676 but are not opposed to it either.  It's a long shot, but that's why we have to keep hammering away at them until they get the message.  No, it obviously can't pass in the Republican held House and Senate, but that's not the point; by supporting HR676, you will be running on a stronger platform, and give the Democrats a better chance of retaking the majority in 2018, at which point there's no reason it shouldn't be able to pass.

 

After the speakers segment, Our Revolution staged a "die-in" event where people would hold tombstones labeled with preventable causes of death, preexisting conditions, and high-risk categories.  Ungodly already listed some of these in another thread.  Though I wasn't able to stay the whole time, so while I helped set up the stunt, I didn't see them do it.

 

I often hear "criticism" from right-wing pundits that universal healthcare is unfeasible and unsustainable because there's no way to pay for it.  To these assholes, I have the following to say:

* A 2009 study from before Obamacare found that 45,000 people die every year from preventable causes due to lack of healthcare.  That's 123 people every day.  So how much money are those lives worth then?

* The US workforce loses roughly $576 billion in annual productivity due to illness.  If you want to put a price tag on healthcare, then you'd damn well better compare it to numbers like this.

* Trump's proposed budget would include $54 billion in increased military spending to fund the already bloated military-industrial complex, and would cut social programs in an attempt to pay for it.  So what, we can easily afford more weapons intended to kill people, but not programs intended to save lives?

* Universal healthcare would actually save a lot of money in various ways, and these are almost never factored into the arguments that single-payer would be too expensive.


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The new Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy: Massacre a crowd of civilians, draw a target around them, and declare they were all terrorists.


#2
Frozenwolf150

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This is the video archive of the livestream of the Healthcare for All forum I attended this past Tuesday.  It was organized by Our Revolution.  I didn't ask a question myself, so you won't see me in the Q&A session.  Many people are uninformed or misinformed about single-payer, and the speeches have a lot of good information to set the record straight.

 

Part 1:

 

Part 2:

https://www.facebook.../?fref=mentions

 

 

Also, anyone, Republican or Democrat, who opposes universal healthcare should be shot out of a cannon aimed at the sun.  (By that I mean voted out of office.)


The new Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy: Massacre a crowd of civilians, draw a target around them, and declare they were all terrorists.


#3
Ungodly

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I certainly agree about un-electing politicians who oppose health care for all humans.  The BS lies used to argue against universal health care don't hold up to examination.

 

Unfortunately for us, the corporations that own and operate our Congress would rather our keep system of fatal greed.

 

We need to seize control of our government.


Join our religion of love and peace or burn in hell!


#4
Frozenwolf150

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As an addendum to my first post, there are additional reasons why single-payer would save money.

 

* Cost projections of single-payer by people who oppose it cite the high cost of current single-payer systems in the US.  However, this is misleading, because those disproportionately cover groups with the heaviest medical needs.

* Preventive care saves money for obvious reasons.  People who have no insurance or can't afford doctor's visits will skip out on preventive care, and by the time they do get sick and decide to see a doctor, they are far sicker than they should be.  This means that their treatment costs are much higher.

* Americans already pay at least twice as much on average for healthcare as people in other developed nations, for substandard care.  As of 2016, the average cost was over $10,000.  So under a single-payer system, your taxes would go up $5,000 but you'd still be saving $5,000.

* Currently we pay more for prescription drugs than other nations, like Canada, because there's no negotiation allowed for drug prices and the importation of cheaper drugs is not allowed.  1 in 5 Americans have gone without filling their prescription because it cost too much, and guess what?  If you don't get the medicine you need, you get sicker, and that will drive up your healthcare costs down the road.

* To all those assholes who say the free market is God and accuse progressives of knowing nothing about economics, I say this.  You've got to spend money to make money.  If you invest in the healthcare of American workers, they'll have greater productivity, and also be able to move to better paying jobs since their healthcare isn't chained to their employment.  This means more economic growth, and more tax revenue.

 

 

I also wanted to post this link to the podcast of Bernie Sanders (yes, he has a podcast) in particular the one with Elizabeth Warren, since they're talking about this very issue and bring up some additional points.

https://www.sanders....bernies-podcast


The new Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy: Massacre a crowd of civilians, draw a target around them, and declare they were all terrorists.


#5
Frozenwolf150

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Related, Politifact did an analysis of the claims of the different cost estimates for a single-payer system.

http://www.politifac...ayer-system-be/

 

The excerpt that caught my attention was:

"So, oddly, our calculation produced exactly the same amount of federal health spending -- $1.38 trillion a year -- as Sanders’ own estimate for his single-payer plan."

 

Let's figure this out manually.  In 2016, Americans spent $10,345 on average for healthcare, and a grand total of $3.4 trillion.  Now, factor in that this is more than twice per capita of other nations.  Canada, our nearest neighbor, spends half of what we do.  Therefore you have to cut that $3.4 trillion figure in half, which comes to $1.7 trillion.  That's pretty close to the estimate Sanders gave, much closer than the highball estimates that do not factor in the savings.


Edited by Frozenwolf150, 24 July 2017 - 12:10 PM.

The new Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy: Massacre a crowd of civilians, draw a target around them, and declare they were all terrorists.




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: healthcare, single-payer, universal healthcare, new jersey, california, new york

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