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Going to Moscow for a tan? Take lots of sunscreen!

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#1
Unbeliever

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Sunbathers bask in record Moscow heatwave

#2
Ungodly

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I can relate to this story.  Not that it is usually cold here in Palm Springs, it isn't.  But it sure has warmed up early this year.  I just came in from the garden after planting 1 more tomato plant, 4 squash plants, and 6 bell pepper plants.  These joined the 8 or 10 tomato plants I put in several weeks ago.

I'm exhausted from the heat.  It's 82 outside right now, and 81 in the house.

By this time in July the temperature will be about 120 degrees fahrenheit, or at least 110.

#3
Unbeliever

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Well, I've got a feeling you'd better get used to it, or invest in an air conditioner. I think it's goona get hotter'n hell in the next few years, and dry.

#4
Ungodly

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We have 2 whole-house cooling systems.  The swamp cooler (evaporative cooler) is fine during our typical desert low humidity days. Then we have a central air conditioning system.  This is required when the humidity gets too high for the swamp cooler to be effective.

In an emergency, we have our swimming pool.

So bring it on, Al Gore!

#5
Unbeliever

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How often does the humidity get that high? Is it seasonal? We had a lot of humidity in the south, the Gulf states. It was terrible. In Dallas it could be 115, and 95% humidity! I could only stand that for so long, and had to come back to good old sunny California. New Orleans was just about as bad, but at least it was, well, New Orleans!

I recently heard on the news that there's not as much water in the snowpack as they'd like. And yet, we just flush the precious stuff right down the toilet. I think water is one of our most precious recources, and soon it might be water instead of oil we'll be fighting over.

#6
Ungodly

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We usually get a spell of very high humidity with high temperatures around late July or August.  It can last for 3 to 6 weeks.  It is called the Monsoon season, because rain clouds do make it over our protective mountain range shield.

In the monsoon season we often experience a phenomenon called virga.  It has nothing to do with pharmaceutical spam, that is spelled differently. Virga is when the clouds rain, but the air below them is so hot and dry that the rain evaporates before it hits the ground.  Think sauna.


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